Opinion: Why Universities Need to Prepare for Online Classes This Summer Instead of Trying to Open in The Fall

Colleges and Universities in the United States, due to reasonable suspicion, need to prepare for having online classes in the fall instead of hoping for residential learning. Colleges were among one of the first institutions to be shut down following the news of COVID-19. We can suspect that they will be among the last to reopen. There are reasonable suspicion colleges won’t be allowed to have unrestricted classes in the fall, college students may not want to take the risk, and we need to dispel the fear that online education is the second tier.

It is reasonable to suspect that most colleges and universities won’t be allowed to have unrestricted classes starting in the fall. Most colleges have classes consisting of persons from multiple states and different backgrounds. The government will view this as a hotspot for spreading the virus. To avoid being possibly responsible for a “second wave” they will most likely mandate online learning. There will also be a concern for international students and their home countries. College students may not want to take the risk of being exposed and spreading the virus.

College takes place during the most vulnerable time for the spread of disease, wintertime. The flu spreads very quickly on college campuses and we can only assume that the coronavirus would too. Students most likely, if given a reliable option for online learning, would choose to stay at home to learn while deeming safe from potentially spreading the virus.

Online education is not the second tier. This is the ideal opportunity to prove that online is the future of learning. Most students would love to save “Room and Board” each year and receive their college degree. This is the opportunity colleges have to prove that they can be competitive and cost-effective by implementing online learning on a larger scale when the stakes are higher.


McIntireForDelegate

Darton McIntire

Darton McIntire, a WV House District 50 Republican Candidate, is a Pre-Law Student and hopeful servant in the WV Legislature. He addresses his concerns with the direction of the country, the state, and his local cities in writing for people to read. His main goal in writing is to provoke critical thinking and promote government accountability. He promotes small government and looks to protect our inalienable rights granted in the Constitution.

West Virginia Has a New Way for County Governments to be Accountable and Marion County Needs to Adopt It

The Marion County Commission can increase trust and create transparency by participating in “Project Mountaineer.” A project initiated by the State Auditor’s office which grants taxpayers the privilege of viewing county expenses. Nineteen counties in WV, including Monongalia county, have adopted the Auditors project with the state which provides the software free of cost. Marion County needs to adopt Project Mountaineer because it will promote transparency and trust with our county government, give taxpayers a more accessible way of viewing where our money goes, and only requires action from the Commissioners.
First, it will promote transparency and trust with our county’s government. The ability for taxpayers to review and approve of our county’s decisions will create a better relationship with our leaders. The most trusting relationship between citizens and government is when the government is transparent with their spending agenda and is open towards being questioned. Publicizing the budget will create public interest, and when this information is easily accessible taxpayers can start questioning our local leaders if needed.
Secondly, taxpayers deserve to have a more accessible way of viewing where their money goes. This software will make any person, with access to the internet, be able to view how money is being spent. Currently, there is no easy access for us to instantly look up, efficiently, how our county spends our money. Having a more accessible way to view spending will create an atmosphere of accountability. When accountability happens, and it will, we will have a more efficient government. That should always be the goal for our leaders.
Lastly, it is completely free but requires the commission’s action. The Marion County Commissioners must take action to participate in this project. The project is accessible and other counties, large and small, have decided to participate. Monongalia County and Kanawha county, which have a greater population and revenue then Marion county does, are participating in the project and promoting transparency. I believe Marion County should too.


McIntireForDelegate

Darton McIntire

Darton McIntire, a WV House District 50 Republican Candidate, is a Pre-Law Student and hopeful servant in the WV Legislature. He addresses his concerns with the direction of the country, the state, and his local cities in writing for people to read. His main goal in writing is to provoke critical thinking and promote government accountability. He promotes small government and looks to protect our inalienable rights granted in the Constitution.

OPINION: Our Lives are Being Decided by One Man and That’s a Problem.

This pandemic exhibited the lack of preparedness by our State and Federal governments, displayed the need for protocol presuming a future threat, and demand for elected officials in the legislature to have a special joint committee in session to form the response. The Coronavirus has devastated the economy, unexpectedly ended events until further notice, and put our lives in the hands of only the Governor’s office and its interests. The public deserves transparency on the protocol and legislators need to have a voice in deciding the response.

First, the Federal and State governments were unprepared to handle a pandemic. The lack of transparency has created distrust by those who are growing uneasy with a needed timeline. It is natural to distrust the government, which is deserving due to a lack of confidence.  We needed the “reopen” timeline given by the governor earlier. Then the people can hold our elected officials to those standards and know the plan that is in place.

Secondly, the need for protocol presuming an inevitable future threat. A need for a set plan to follow before a stay at home order is in place. We need classifications given to businesses, when they apply for their business license, of whether they are essential during a crisis. This removes favoritism from the executive office which may have business interests in the state. We need to remove favoritism by creating a protocol before the pandemic begins.

Lastly, multiple elected persons need to manage virus response. The Governor should have called a special session and requested a joint committee, made up of experienced members of the Senate and House who have worked in health and business, to help make decisions on the response. Legislators have a closer relationship with constituents than the executive office and can better formulate public opinion.


McIntireForDelegate

Darton McIntire

Darton McIntire, a WV House District 50 Republican Candidate, is a Pre-Law Student and hopeful servant in the WV Legislature. He addresses his concerns with the direction of the country, the state, and his local cities in writing for people to read. His main goal in writing is to provoke critical thinking and promote government accountability. He promotes small government and looks to protect our inalienable rights granted in the Constitution.